My Journey with WIL Uganda

14th June 2018

Susan striking a pose at the WIL Uganda office When WIL Uganda had just begun the programme of Crafts, they had to look for people who can manage that programme, so I was chosen and given an agreement to sign and we started from there. I was already trained with Crafts skills alongside another facilitator, and we managed a big group of women at the start. The other facilitator Sara and I spent two years training women to make products. After some products were made, the director would take them to the UK and move around selling those products. The organization was making earrings bracelets and jewelry. A time came when the programme was running but had to stop because we couldn’t find a specific place to sell the products and get the money for the women. The director didn’t want the women to keep coming to make crafts and not receiving an income for their work, it was too discouraging. Then we started searching for ways to sell products online, and last year we were successful in finding a company that buys our products and the women receive the money. Last year WIL Uganda helped me go and join a tailoring training, I was training for 3 months because of their support. Because they helped pay for this training I am very grateful and I graduated in November 2017. Tailoring is a very serious and big programme, I was given an introduction of making practical things li

Posted in Blog by ucl_admin | Tags: , , , , ,
10th May 2018

Photo of a student in the Adult Literacy programme, Irene Namuganza, introducing herself in English   A few weeks ago the Adult Literacy programme had a session focusing on self-introductions. In this session with Adult Learners on April 8th I realized the capacity of the learners to introduce themselves in English and to “own” a platform.   People came forward and explained things about their lives and we learnt more about them. When the exercise went on in class, one student, Irene Namuganza, firmly introduced herself. She stated she is a housewife married to a gospel preacher and secondary school teacher at Numutumba Secondary School and so on.   Her body language told it all, how confident she was on the platform. She told the class that she is a mother of six, some of whom had completed ordinary level of secondary education. The art of body language was really developed for Irene. She chose a good diction in her expression. She only needed correction in sentence construction here and there, which is great progress for her compared to where she was at the start of her time in the programme.   I hope if Adult Learners concentrate on the Literacy programme, they will be empowered even more so to express themselves very well in public. When the women concentrate and keep coming they have a better chance of achieving their goals and

Posted in Blog by ucl_admin | Tags: , , , , ,
9th March 2017

“Football! We really want to play football,” was the unanimous response of both teenage girls and grown-up women to the question what they wanted to do on International Women’s Day. Football and sports are generally a man’s thing, here. But on International Women’s Day, March 8, women decide what the festivities look like. [text continues after photo] International Women's Day Football At 11:30AM, the girls and women lined up at the football pitch. The girls, all from schools where we run our programmes, played in sporty shirts and stretchy skirts. The women, all participants on our community programmes, wore festive traditional dress: bold dresses with pointy shoulders, bright colours and the occasional glitter. Barefoot, laughing, yelling and screaming, they ran across the football field. An energetic match followed by a dramatic series of penalties eventually resulted in victory for the girl’s team.

“I am very happy to be part of these women on this day”

The International Women’s Day festivities continued at WIL Uganda’s office in the center of the village. Girls from local high

1st March 2017

Rehmar is a 15-year-old student at Townside High School. She loves to eat rice, and her favourite subject is English. Rehmar is a passionate advocate for education, and she is a current member of the Teen Voices Programme. Articles are published online at this website. Rehmars advice to other girls would be to “take education as a serious thing”.

“School helps me to know and understand more about the world.”

Rehmar loves going to school. She likes to learn and explore things she doesn’t know about. Rehmar wants to be a doctor, and she aims to achieve this by reading sciences and concentrating on her studies. School is very important to her as she believes that, were she not studying, there would be no good future for her, and she would end up getting married at a young age. This is an all too common problem in Uganda; 40% of girls under the age of 18 are married, and consequently many of them drop out of school.

“[My community could improve] by educating people.”

Rehmar believes that if the whole community is educated then there would be easy access to everything. If people are not educated, then they can’t earn enough money to send their children to school. WIL Uganda empowers women in the community by educating them in l