Teenage Pregnancy Essay Competition [SRH Programme]

17th August 2017

written by Leah Kenny In July 2017, WIL Uganda held an essay competition on “Teenage Pregnancy: Problems and Prevention” in three partner secondary schools. WIL Uganda’s Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) programme runs after school hours across different schools in Busembatia. The programme covers topics ranging from menstrual hygiene to protecting yourself from sexually transmitted diseases. In rural Uganda, teenage pregnancy, and subsequently school drop-outs, are very common. Students who attended the SRH classes were encouraged to participate in the competition. The invitation was also extended to all students in the schools. We received many essays from students in their first, second and third year of secondary school. The essays showed the students had understood the consequences of teenage pregnancy and how it can be prevented in their communities. Essay competitions like these, are an important way to get students to think critically about sexual and reproductive health issues. The essays were judged on their style, but more importantly on their content. The prizes for 3rd, 2nd and 1st place were given out in each school at the end of term. The winning essays were ones that stated a number of social, economic and health consequences of teenage pregnancy. In addition they recognised the importance of: sex educ

30th March 2017

Alice Knights, former intern for WIL Uganda’s Crafts programme, is now back in Uganda. We interviewed her about her experience as an intern, her motivations and the challenges she met during her stay.

You interned for WIL Uganda. Now you’re back and working in Jinja for another NGO. What brought you back?

I interned with WIL Uganda in October 2016 and had a really great experience with them. And yes, now I’m back. This time it’s more permanent. I’m working for Soft Power Education, who work to improve quality of life for children in Uganda through education. I had actually been to Uganda twice before interning with WIL Uganda so I knew the Jinja area quite well and after interning with WIL I knew I wanted to find a job using my International Development degree there.

Where it all began: WIL Uganda. What made you choose this specific NGO?

I found the internship with WIL Uganda on idealist.org while I was looking for jobs. I literally could not believe my luck when I saw the job description for the Crafts internship. It encompassed four of my biggest passions in life: women’s empowerment, crafts, development and Uganda. I remember ringing my sister straight away and telling her a

24th February 2017

My name is Vincent Zinunula. Zinunula is a language proverb that goes: “E Zinunula Omunaku, lugaba azituunga kiro.” This would literally be translated in English as “The money which redeems a poor man is minted by God overnight.” The Luganda proverb is meant to always give the Baganda people hope whenever they find themselves in desperate situations.

“If you educate a woman, you educate a nation”

I joined WIL Uganda at the request of Cianne Jones. She visited the project I was running at the moment. Then she asked me to work on the Adult Literacy program because of my experience in working with adult learners. At the time I was very ready to help. It felt right because I had the experience, and my organization had had many volunteers over, while I had never volunteered before. Now it is my turn, I thought. From the beginning I supported the mission of WIL Uganda. As far as I’m concerned, if you educate a woman, you educate a nation. For me it was very important to give my input on how we can elevate the women of Uganda. Now, I’ve been with WIL Uganda since the beginning in August 2014. To me, Women in Leadership can mean a lot of things. You can look at it from many angles, but the primary meaning is always this: women are our mothers. We get our first education from them. By helping them and te

13th February 2017

My name is Mugole Joseph: social scientist, aged 27 years and community mobilizer volunteering for Women in Leadership – Uganda (WIL-Uganda). I am fortunate enough to always work in an environment with colleagues representing many different countries or nationalities. I would like to share some of the great things that I have observed from working with people from a diverse mix of countries.

  • The close team working culture at WIL Uganda means that the opportunities to experience the benefits of working in a multinational and a multicultural environment are particularly prevalent.
  • It increases my value to employers The fact is that, if you have international experience, you are more attractive to employers and more likely to be involved in interesting multicultural environments and expansion projects for your employer. It has typically given me a broader experience, working with people from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, especially working with people from different parts of the world. You get a chance to learn different cultures and perspectives as you experience diversity over time.
  • Insights and creativity thrive I am not a psychologist, but I do have a keen interest in behavioral psychology. There are countless studies proving that creativity and new insights thrive in environments where people have diffe