Reflection on Adult Learners Self Introducing

10th May 2018

Photo of a student in the Adult Literacy programme, Irene Namuganza, introducing herself in English   A few weeks ago the Adult Literacy programme had a session focusing on self-introductions. In this session with Adult Learners on April 8th I realized the capacity of the learners to introduce themselves in English and to “own” a platform.   People came forward and explained things about their lives and we learnt more about them. When the exercise went on in class, one student, Irene Namuganza, firmly introduced herself. She stated she is a housewife married to a gospel preacher and secondary school teacher at Numutumba Secondary School and so on.   Her body language told it all, how confident she was on the platform. She told the class that she is a mother of six, some of whom had completed ordinary level of secondary education. The art of body language was really developed for Irene. She chose a good diction in her expression. She only needed correction in sentence construction here and there, which is great progress for her compared to where she was at the start of her time in the programme.   I hope if Adult Learners concentrate on the Literacy programme, they will be empowered even more so to express themselves very well in public. When the women concentrate and keep coming they have a better chance of achieving their goals and

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30th April 2018

‘I Want To….’ Participants of Townside High School and facilitator Bethan Williams pictured above, during a class activity used to establish personal and collective objectives   During my time as a journalism intern with WIL Uganda, I have been lucky enough to facilitate sessions with many inspiring young women. As the school term ends and this week marks the final sessions with in school youth, here I reflect on the achievements, operational challenges and the things I’ll take away,  from implementing the Teen Voices programme in Busembatia.   Facilitating sessions is just one part of my role here with WIL Uganda. However, the opportunity to foster growth and community engagement on a grassroots level by conducting sessions with in school youth, is one which I fully embrace. I welcome the opportunity to be ‘in the field’ and have direct contact with the local community, a hands-on ability to impact capacity-building amongst young women, it’s refreshing and rejuvenating.   It acts a regular reminder of why I do what I do, and why I feel so strongly about the role of informed women in their own development. I feel honoured to work with such bright and motivated young people. When I am with them, I feel alive and bask in their light and how much they shine with enthusiasm, eagerness and motivation. The girls can be critical and analytical, s

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1st March 2017

Rehmar is a 15-year-old student at Townside High School. She loves to eat rice, and her favourite subject is English. Rehmar is a passionate advocate for education, and she is a current member of the Teen Voices Programme. Articles are published online at this website. Rehmars advice to other girls would be to “take education as a serious thing”.

“School helps me to know and understand more about the world.”

Rehmar loves going to school. She likes to learn and explore things she doesn’t know about. Rehmar wants to be a doctor, and she aims to achieve this by reading sciences and concentrating on her studies. School is very important to her as she believes that, were she not studying, there would be no good future for her, and she would end up getting married at a young age. This is an all too common problem in Uganda; 40% of girls under the age of 18 are married, and consequently many of them drop out of school.

“[My community could improve] by educating people.”

Rehmar believes that if the whole community is educated then there would be easy access to everything. If people are not educated, then they can’t earn enough money to send their children to school. WIL Uganda empowers women in the community by educating them in l

24th February 2017

My name is Vincent Zinunula. Zinunula is a language proverb that goes: “E Zinunula Omunaku, lugaba azituunga kiro.” This would literally be translated in English as “The money which redeems a poor man is minted by God overnight.” The Luganda proverb is meant to always give the Baganda people hope whenever they find themselves in desperate situations.

“If you educate a woman, you educate a nation”

I joined WIL Uganda at the request of Cianne Jones. She visited the project I was running at the moment. Then she asked me to work on the Adult Literacy program because of my experience in working with adult learners. At the time I was very ready to help. It felt right because I had the experience, and my organization had had many volunteers over, while I had never volunteered before. Now it is my turn, I thought. From the beginning I supported the mission of WIL Uganda. As far as I’m concerned, if you educate a woman, you educate a nation. For me it was very important to give my input on how we can elevate the women of Uganda. Now, I’ve been with WIL Uganda since the beginning in August 2014. To me, Women in Leadership can mean a lot of things. You can look at it from many angles, but the primary meaning is always this: women are our mothers. We get our first education from them. By helping them and te

13th February 2017

My name is Mugole Joseph: social scientist, aged 27 years and community mobilizer volunteering for Women in Leadership – Uganda (WIL-Uganda). I am fortunate enough to always work in an environment with colleagues representing many different countries or nationalities. I would like to share some of the great things that I have observed from working with people from a diverse mix of countries.

  • The close team working culture at WIL Uganda means that the opportunities to experience the benefits of working in a multinational and a multicultural environment are particularly prevalent.
  • It increases my value to employers The fact is that, if you have international experience, you are more attractive to employers and more likely to be involved in interesting multicultural environments and expansion projects for your employer. It has typically given me a broader experience, working with people from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, especially working with people from different parts of the world. You get a chance to learn different cultures and perspectives as you experience diversity over time.
  • Insights and creativity thrive I am not a psychologist, but I do have a keen interest in behavioral psychology. There are countless studies proving that creativity and new insights thrive in environments where people have diffe