Teen Voices: International Women’s Day flashback

18th July 2017

Every year, WIL Uganda celebrates International Women’s Day on 8 March. We invite women and girls from the community and our programmes to celebrate with us, promoting women’s empowerment. In this article Rebecca (part of our Teen Voices programme) shares her view on this festive day. In every year all Ugandan’s and the world at large remember and celebrate this day. The reason as to why they celebrate is that women are the owner of this country, so, because of this, the President of Uganda Museveni Kagauta Yowert decided to give the women opportunity to have recognition in the country and world at large. Every woman is celebrated, and everybody is in interested in the day. So many women are now members of parliament – ministers – and they always support this day because they have it as their pride from the government. Its good because it helps the younger girls know their rights, makes people aware about what women go through.

“The celebration of this day promotes equality in the country”

When Uganda joins the whole world in celebrating this day, states like Britain, USA and others can give financial assistance to Uganda. This can help Uganda to construct good roads, hospitals and school hence contributing to the economic development of the country. The celebration of thi

1st March 2017

Rehmar is a 15-year-old student at Townside High School. She loves to eat rice, and her favourite subject is English. Rehmar is a passionate advocate for education, and she is a current member of the Teen Voices Programme. Articles are published online at this website. Rehmars advice to other girls would be to “take education as a serious thing”.

“School helps me to know and understand more about the world.”

Rehmar loves going to school. She likes to learn and explore things she doesn’t know about. Rehmar wants to be a doctor, and she aims to achieve this by reading sciences and concentrating on her studies. School is very important to her as she believes that, were she not studying, there would be no good future for her, and she would end up getting married at a young age. This is an all too common problem in Uganda; 40% of girls under the age of 18 are married, and consequently many of them drop out of school.

“[My community could improve] by educating people.”

Rehmar believes that if the whole community is educated then there would be easy access to everything. If people are not educated, then they can’t earn enough money to send their children to school. WIL Uganda empowers women in the community by educating them in l

1st August 2015

On 26th October we took 20 school girls from Townside Secondary School to  see Disney’s newest blockbuster Queen of Katwe at Century Cinemax in Kampala. The film depicts the true story of Phiona a young girl from the slums of Kampala who becomes a world champion chess player.  Many of the girls live very basically very much like Phiona in the film and were interviewed after the film about their reactions: What are your names and how old are you? My name is Ezereda and I am 15 years old. My name is Moureen and I am 15 years old. My name is Ruth and I am 15 years old. Did you enjoy the trip to see Queen of Katwe? Ezereda: Yes, I enjoyed. On the way to Kampala, I saw the different plantations, like sugar, which I had not seen before. Moureen: Yes, I enjoy. Ruth: Yes. I enjoyed because I saw the film ‘Queen of Katwe.’ Had you been to Kampala before? Ezereda: No, I had never been. Moureen: Never. Ruth: No, I had not. What did you like about Kampala? Ezereda: I liked the way they built their buildings. There is a big difference to how we build them in Busembatia. It is important to go to different places because it g