Interview with Alice Knights, former Crafts intern

30th March 2017

Alice Knights, former intern for WIL Uganda’s Crafts programme, is now back in Uganda. We interviewed her about her experience as an intern, her motivations and the challenges she met during her stay.

You interned for WIL Uganda. Now you’re back and working in Jinja for another NGO. What brought you back?

I interned with WIL Uganda in October 2016 and had a really great experience with them. And yes, now I’m back. This time it’s more permanent. I’m working for Soft Power Education, who work to improve quality of life for children in Uganda through education. I had actually been to Uganda twice before interning with WIL Uganda so I knew the Jinja area quite well and after interning with WIL I knew I wanted to find a job using my International Development degree there.

Where it all began: WIL Uganda. What made you choose this specific NGO?

I found the internship with WIL Uganda on idealist.org while I was looking for jobs. I literally could not believe my luck when I saw the job description for the Crafts internship. It encompassed four of my biggest passions in life: women’s empowerment, crafts, development and Uganda. I remember ringing my sister straight away and telling her a

27th March 2017

Written by Zai, WIL Uganda’s office manager Women In Leadership, WIL Uganda, is a registered non-governmental organisation which aims at empowering both girls and women. It was founded and started its operations on 03/08/2014. It has various projects that aim to fulfill its mission of empowering both women and girls. Some of these projects are carried out in schools and others in out of school communities. The organisation had a very humble start: we had no office space, it was operated as a community based organisation, our team was small and it consisted of only five national volunteers and one international volunteer who is the director.

The first year with WIL Uganda

The beginning was not completely easy for me. I had to move from Jinja to Busembatia, a village I had never been to before. Whilst in the village, I taught adult literacy learners every Sunday afternoon between 2pm and 5pm. On other days, Wednesday and Thursday, I was running the Leadership programme at Townside High School. This was my weekly routine schedule. After a while, we got some office space and this was one of our greatest achievements in a very short time. After a year, due to our good combined effort and its effect on the community, we

1st March 2017

Rehmar is a 15-year-old student at Townside High School. She loves to eat rice, and her favourite subject is English. Rehmar is a passionate advocate for education, and she is a current member of the Teen Voices Programme. Articles are published online at this website. Rehmars advice to other girls would be to “take education as a serious thing”.

“School helps me to know and understand more about the world.”

Rehmar loves going to school. She likes to learn and explore things she doesn’t know about. Rehmar wants to be a doctor, and she aims to achieve this by reading sciences and concentrating on her studies. School is very important to her as she believes that, were she not studying, there would be no good future for her, and she would end up getting married at a young age. This is an all too common problem in Uganda; 40% of girls under the age of 18 are married, and consequently many of them drop out of school.

“[My community could improve] by educating people.”

Rehmar believes that if the whole community is educated then there would be easy access to everything. If people are not educated, then they can’t earn enough money to send their children to school. WIL Uganda empowers women in the community by educating them in l