My Journey with WIL Uganda

14th June 2018

Susan striking a pose at the WIL Uganda office When WIL Uganda had just begun the programme of Crafts, they had to look for people who can manage that programme, so I was chosen and given an agreement to sign and we started from there. I was already trained with Crafts skills alongside another facilitator, and we managed a big group of women at the start. The other facilitator Sara and I spent two years training women to make products. After some products were made, the director would take them to the UK and move around selling those products. The organization was making earrings bracelets and jewelry. A time came when the programme was running but had to stop because we couldn’t find a specific place to sell the products and get the money for the women. The director didn’t want the women to keep coming to make crafts and not receiving an income for their work, it was too discouraging. Then we started searching for ways to sell products online, and last year we were successful in finding a company that buys our products and the women receive the money. Last year WIL Uganda helped me go and join a tailoring training, I was training for 3 months because of their support. Because they helped pay for this training I am very grateful and I graduated in November 2017. Tailoring is a very serious and big programme, I was given an introduction of making practical things li

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12th May 2017

Jamie works as Adult Literacy intern for WIL Uganda. Every weekday, he reaches out to women in the community to teach them English. But there’s more to teaching English than just learning new words: empowering women is what our organisation is about. “Mulija Bukonte. Ndi musomesa,” I answer the conductor on the matatu. He asked me where I was going and what I am doing here. I am a teacher and have been working in this community in Busembatia for 3 months now. Today, Joseph and I reach out to Angela in Bukonte. Angela and many women like her on our programme have received little or no formal education. Their levels vary greatly, but what they have in common is their age-bracket. They are all adults, and I am, as of three months, an adult literacy teacher. I have been a teacher for quite some time now, starting as a private tutor. I taught a skills course at my university during my BA and MA. Most recently I have been working with students that had been in conflict with the law, or came from turbulent at-home situations or had had an otherwise bumpy ride in life so far. What they had in common was a healthy dislike for school, class and teachers. Getting them to pay me some attention other than utter disdain was a daily battle. I thought teaching adult women who came to us of their own volition would be a stroll